HOW AUTISM BECAME A WINDOW TO THE SOUL

seventhvoice:

This is a very interesting read.

Originally posted on Pandaemonium:

curious incident

Gregory Hollin is a researcher at Nottingham University’s Institute for Science and Society whose work explores changing perceptions of autism, both scientific and cultural. He recently wrote a superb essay for the anthropology website Somatosphere which looked at the relationship between the rise of autism as a cultural phenomenon and changing scientific conceptions of human nature and of the ‘social’, and at how these changes have led to the view of ‘the social hole in autism’ as ‘a window to the soul’. My thanks to Greg, and to Somatosphere, for allowing me to republishing the essay on Pandaemonium.


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Gregory Hollin
Autism, sociality and human nature

There are, I believe, a few reasons to suppose that autism is a particularly fascinating area to be studying at the moment. What are those reasons? Firstly, prevalence rates of autism have soared in recent decades, from 1:2,500 in 1978 to around…

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4 Clues You Are A Woman With Asperger’s

seventhvoice:

What clues did you have?

Originally posted on Thought Catalog:

Ninety percent of Asperger diagnoses are for boys. Not because girls don’t have Asperger’s, but because it’s so much harder to identify in girls that they go largely undiagnosed. I didn’t know I have Asperger’s until my son was diagnosed.

Asperger’s is a developmental disorder–often associated with Silicon Valley as the “Geek Syndrome“–that’s almost impossible to self-identify because central to the dysfunction is very poor social skills. But poor social skills means that you are missing social cues which means that you don’t know you’re missing social cues. Everyone in the room wants you to shut up and you don’t know it.

More importantly, people with Asperger’s often never gain the soft skills so important for workplace success. Aspergers comes with a high risk of depression, homeslessness and suicide. So identifying it in girls is important.

People can identify boys with Asperger’s because…

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How Society Is A Victim to What It Does Not Understand

seventhvoice:

“While society is actively obsessed with treating the mental illness part of a social disorder which is the secondary condition that the person is leaving with it is also completely ignoring the primary condition which is the social disorder itself that causes the mental illness.

Simply put, society continues to be victimized by what it cannot understand. The question is “how do we help society understand?”

Originally posted on Travis Breeding:

Time and time again we see society effected by a tragedy like the one in Santa Barbara or the one at Sandy Hook Elementary.  While there are victims and families of victims who are directly effected by these senseless and unnecessary tragedies there also also the rest of us who are out here living in society who in a way are indirect victims of something that our brains are unaware of.

Our brains are unaware of what we are being traumatized and victimized by because for most of us this part of the brain is a natural thing that we use each day.  We use it with little to no effort at all and do not even think about what it might be like to not use it.

For a few people in society this part of the brain is not intact.  This causes a social disorder. There are many…

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Aspergers is…

seventhvoice:

Sharing your words….

Originally posted on autisticlemonade:

Awash in emotions that encompass my being

Yet my blank stare leaves the masses unseeing

Trying to be seen, when I clearly see

That’s what Aspergers is to me

Telling the contents of my heart to a lover

Trying to express that there will be no other

If I could say it with my eyes, I’d pay any fee

That’s what Aspergers is to me

Expressing to my family the depths of my love

They should know that there is no one above

But expressions of love are too grand to be

That’s what Aspergers is to me

Strangers to companions, it’s so hard to connect

When words of friendship don’t come out correct

Paths of words lost, just let me be free

That’s what Aspergers is to me

Aspergers is loneliness

Aspergers is pain

Aspergers is the feeling of going insane

Emotions criss-crossing, like the limbs of a tree

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Puppet strings…

seventhvoice:

Sharing your words…….

Originally posted on autisticlemonade:

Tear me apart, and rebuild me whole

Give me expressions, emotions, a sense of control

Make me a real boy, free of puppet strings

So I can do all of the plain people things

Cavort with companions, enjoy a meal

Feel the range of emotions that I’m meant to feel

Embrace my enemy, embrace my friend

Embrace myself, and then do it again

Smile once genuinely from the heart

Place up my barriers, tear them apart

Love every person as if they were myself

Then take all that love and bathe in the wealth

Yet no man can remake me, there is no cure

I’m stuck in this body, of that much I’m sure

Cursed to be the expressionless boy

Faking emotions like a doll or a toy

Trapped in the bubble of lonely space

Comforted by no friend or lovers embrace

So ridden with guilt, wrapped in depression

My…

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Do you experience anxiety, extreme shyness or have trouble making friends?

 

Artwork by Jason Limon

Artwork by Jason Limon

Are you experiencing:

“Crippling social anxiety?

EXTREME shyness?

Trouble making casual friends?

Feeling isolated?  

You’re not alone ….

There’s a chance you may be among the gifted few,

Blessed with expansion-pack wiring.

Don’t suffer in silence ,

Explore the wonders of Asperger’s.  

Find your tribe,

You’ll be relieved you did.”

Words by  Kami Bee.

You are always welcome to come and join us at  WASP Women’s Asperger’s Syndrome Awareness Page to learn more. http://www.facebook.com/waspwantsyou

 

This Is Autism

Originally posted on Signposts in the fog:

I live in the moment.
The immediate.
I stop to smell the roses.
I also smell burning way before anyone else (other than another autistic person, perhaps).
My husband affectionately called me a bloodhound.
I see order in chaos.
My filing system is chaotic.
I cannot work with it in any other way.
I systemise everything in my life.
People talk to me about their problems because I see solutions others often don’t see.
I think outside the box.
I am outside the box.
I form deep connections with people.
My conversation is not frivolous.
I get to the point.
I accept and respect without judgement.
I don’t conform.
I’m a vegetarian who eats fish, and chicken.
Oh and occasionally sweet and sour spare ribs, but only if they haven’t come from gerbils.
I believe everything I’m told.
I’m innocent, despite my experience.
I’m loyal.
I’m focused.
I have high…

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When Doctors Decide Your Disease Doesn’t Actually Exist

seventhvoice:

Fantastic article……

Originally posted on pundit from another planet:

People come to like their diagnoses, or at least to feel that they have explanatory power for the dissatisfactions in their lives.

shutterstock_156147731

images courtesy shutterstock / wallybird

Theodore Dalrymple writes: Diseases that have no objective tests to distinguish them from normality have a tendency to spread like fungus: for example, it is years since I heard anyone say that he was unhappy rather than depressed, and it cannot be a coincidence that 10 percent of the populations of most western countries are now taking antidepressants. Yet the state of melancholia undoubtedly exists, as anyone who has seen a case will attest.

Likewise with autism. I remember an isolated, friendless and uncommunicative patient who tried to kill himself when his landlord could no longer tolerate the collection of light-bulbs that he had collected since childhood, was constantly enlarging, and that now threatened to fill the whole house. For the…

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What about girls with Asperger’s syndrome?

seventhvoice:

Great post…..

Originally posted on Land of My Sojourn:

In my last post, I said that I think researchers have overlooked Asperger’s syndrome in females, and that’s the biggest problem I have with the “extreme male brain” theory of autism. I’m not the only one that thinks so. Recently I read a very interesting article online from the British Sunday paper The Observer:

Doctors are ‘failing to spot Asperger’s in girls’by Amelia Hill, April 12, 2009.

The article quotes Dr. Judith Gould, director of the UK’s National Autistic Society.  In 1979, she and Lorna Wing co-wrote a paper that helped to begin the process of defining Asperger’s and the autism spectrum.  The British government is forming a strategy on dealing with autism, and Gould is pushing for an effort to pay attention to girls on the spectrum.

“We’re failing girls at the moment. We are doing many thousands of them a great disservice. They are either…

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Are we underdiagnosing autism in girls?

Originally posted on Equal Writes:

by Malavika Balachandran

At Camp Sunshine, a summer camp for mentally disabled children that I used to work at as a camp counselor, we had very few (if any) female participants with autism spectrum disorders. The female campers on the autism spectrum always had autism, and not Asperger’s Syndrome, which is characterized by delay in social development, but not verbal development. Doctors, when diagnosing Asperger’s Syndrome, search for lack of friendship, poor social skills, and very intense interests. However, these symptoms represent stereotyped behaviors of males with the disorder, and thus thousands of girls with Asperger’s Syndrome are going undiagnosed. Females with the disorder, while lacking the social interaction skills, often mask their disorder through silence or imitation of others; also females with the disorder are more likely to have friends than males with the disorder and are less likely to externalize their frustrations and instead passive-aggressively deal with their…

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