The Importance of Identifying Asperger’s Syndrome / High Functioning Autism in Adults

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“Growing up with undiagnosed Asperger’s Syndrome can be traumatic for many individuals.”

Many adults with undiagnosed Asperger’s Syndrome are usually keenly aware that they do not ‘fit in’, yet are unable to either express or understand exactly what it is that makes them feel differently to others.

For this reason many undiagnosed adults develop negative perceptions of themselves as “weird”, “crazy,” or “broken.”

Despite these negative self-images, many undiagnosed adults are able to hide their difficulties by developing coping mechanisms, such as mirroring or mimicking those around them in social settings.

They are therefore seen as being able to engage in the everyday routines of life such as working, having relationships, getting married and having children.

Yet though they have the ability to apply such coping mechanisms, many individuals with undiagnosed AS, are never able to shake off the underlying awareness of themselves as inherently ‘different’ to those around them.

Ironically, the very skill sets that adults with undiagnosed moderate to mild Asperger’s apply, in order to try and ‘fit in,’ have meant that they have flown “under the diagnostic radar”.

Other individuals with undiagnosed AS, who have not learnt such skill sets, may show greater signs of having social communication difficulties.

This can make them more susceptible to situations such as chronic unemployment and social isolation due to the fact that they may be mistakenly perceived as people who are deliberately anti-social, argumentative, objectionable or aloof loners who crave only their own company.

In reality, these people may be individuals who are displaying the lack of social skills required to communicate and act appropriately, that make up the characteristics or traits commonly described in Asperger’s Syndrome.

It is now well established that individual with AS may display varying degrees of some or all of the following characteristics:

A lack of social skills which manifest in inappropriate social approaches, responses or social awkwardness.

Difficulty recognizing the facial expressions or emotions of others.

Difficulties in considering or understanding others’ viewpoints.

Limited interest in friendships


Difficulties with being able to communicate their ideas, thoughts and emotions.

Difficulties in comprehending and following social reasoning and adhering to the status quo.

Difficulty with transitions and changes.

Hold a strong need for routines.

Narrow range of interests or idiosyncratic special interests.

Be overly sensitive to sounds, tastes, smells and sights.

Have motor coordination difficulties.

Experience difficulty managing their own negative feelings, especially anxiety, anger and depression

Adults with undiagnosed AS are susceptible to experiencing high degrees of stress, frustration, confusion and anxiety due to their awareness that they do not ]fit in’.

These additional difficulties have often been misinterpreted, misdiagnosed, misunderstood and mistreated, especially when their underlying AS is undiagnosed or not adequately understood.

Some of the most common additional difficulties include:

Angry outbursts (physical or verbal aggression, verbally threatening behavior)

Agitation and restlessness

Increase in obsessive or repetitive activities, thoughts, or speech

Low mood or depression

Apathy and inactivity

Unfortunately many professionals who are unfamiliar with AS often only focus on the surface symptoms and behaviors that an individual with undiagnosed AS may display.

This leaves individuals with undiagnosed AS at risk of being incorrectly diagnosed with conditions such as:

Personality Disorders

Psychosis

Bipolar Disorder

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Mood disorder

It is therefore essential, that in order to prevent individuals with undiagnosed Asperger’s Syndrome from being incorrectly diagnosed with conditions, treatment plans and medications that will not help them, that a thorough Autism assessment must be applied to adults who fall within this criteria.

A proper diagnosis of AS can better help adults put their difficulties into perspective and enable them to understand the underlying reasons for their lifelong struggles.

Correct diagnosis and effective treatment can help improve self-esteem, work performance and skills, educational attainment and social competencies.

More importantly a correct diagnosis can trigger both a journey of self-discovery and a healing process for the individuals concerned. 

 

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Aging and Autism – Insights from the Perspectives of Adults with High Functioning Autism/Asperger Syndrome

Art by Maria Zeldis
Art by Maria Zeldis

Over a year ago I had the privilege of being part of a research team exploring the experiences of adults with High Functioning Autism/Asperger’s Syndrome, within our community. Whilst most of the data generated in the early stages of the research was  considered comparatively raw, I never the less, picked up on some of the less anticipated and therefore more qualitatively unique themes that emerged from within the data.

One of those themes concerned the prospects of aging  for those with High Functioning Autism.

I nominate this as a unique theme because it may very well represent the first time that any research project has stumbled upon the issue of aging as  derived specifically from the perspectives of adults with high functioning autism themselves.

As an Autism parent I am well versed in the realm of potential fears  that we hold for our children’s care as they enter into adulthood.

The ever-present concern of what ‘will happen in the future’  forms not only a salient question for parent carers, but  is also, according to the words of many with High Functioning Autism,  increasingly forming an even more salient and potentially frightening question  for those with high functioning autism themselves.

‘What will happen to me when I can no longer remain independent within my own home?’

The level of concern that adults with high functioning autism express when discussing the issue of their own aging creates  a disturbing picture of  just what the reality of aged care may well represent for them.

A picture that from my perspective, demands that a clearer understanding of how adults with high functioning autism relate to the current structure of the aged care system and its  facilities, be obtained and worked upon as a matter of policy.

For example, could an adult with high functioning autism, who has been independent prior to old age, cope with having to adapt to the routine of a nursing or aged care home?

Would they cope with being told not only when to eat but what to eat?

Would they deal well with a constant intrusion on their privacy by well-meaning staff?

Many of the adults spoken to described the current version of aged care on offer to them as a ‘nightmare’ of epic proportions.

This descriptor was especially strong among those whose ability to lead  an independent life had been premised largely on their ability to remove themselves from the presence of others in order to eliminate stress when necessary.

To me such descriptions pose some serious questions around aging and autism that need to be addressed. For example :

What is on offer for adults with High Functioning  Autism who have extreme sensory sensitivities to noise and/or the presence of others?

What would happen in the event of a meltdown in such an environment?

Are aged care facilities really geared up for handling the multiple sensory issues and sensitivities that adults with High Functioning Autism can experience?

Research is increasingly showing that when it comes to the concerns of those with High Functioning Autism, we are no longer just  talking about the concerns of a small group of people who crave solitude.

Rather, research is beginning to uncover  the legitimate concerns of an increasingly growing number of adults who not only do not want to be placed in aged care facilities, but who doubt their very ability to survive in them.

These are people whose very quality of life can sometimes depend on their capacity to remove themselves from the presence of others. Their concerns are real and they need to be addressed.

Is this something any of you have thought about?

Have you read any articles that tackle the issue of aging and autism?

If so I’d be extremely interested in hearing more about your views on aging.

Thank you for taking the time to  read this post.